Speaker Spotlight: Joni Brennan, President of the Digital ID & Authentication Council of Canada (DIACC)

Welcome to our Summit speaker spotlight series! Each week, learn more about one of our amazing speakers, then make sure you attend their session at The Summit, Canada’s premiere payments conference, May 24-26 in Toronto, ON.

We’re proud to welcome Joni Brennan to The Summit, where she’ll be talking protection—and accelerating Canada’s digital ID ecosystem toward a more trusted global digital economy.
 

About Joni

Building upon 15 years of hands on experience in Identity Access Management innovations and industry standards development, Joni helps the DIACC to fulfill its vision of organizing Canadian market forces to unlock digital identity and authentication economic opportunities for all Canadians. Joni builds diplomatic collaboration relationships and formalizes strategic partnerships. She has participated in international organizational committees and has testified regarding trusted Identity and Access Management systems for the US Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology Security and Privacy.

What motivates you to do what you do? 


Secure, privacy-respecting, and convenient Digital ID has the power to change the world for the better. I’m motivated to address the challenges and opportunities that can be unlocked by working together with innovators of the private and public sectors to accelerate made-for-Canada solutions that will help Canadians to connect to each other and to the world.  Canada can lead the world by developing solutions that represent our values and principles.

How did your earlier career/life choices lead you to where you are now? 


Early in my studies at Rutgers University, I learned about technology standards development and that, through a process of collaboration, governments, businesses, and individuals could work together to build solutions that would make the world a better place. I decided right then and there that I wanted to work in standards and that by working in the field of standards development I could make a lasting contribution to society. 

How do you avoid being complacent in your role? 


I strive to be willing to take a calculated risk from time to time. I try to move beyond my own comfort zone for career and personal growth. Additionally, I try to expand circles of influence.  I try to encourage diversity of views within my personal mentor network. 

What is the biggest risk that you’ve taken? 


Possibly, moving to Canada from New Jersey.  However, I was passionate about immigrating to Canada and becoming part of the diverse fabric of Canadian culture. 

If you could meet one person (alive or dead), who would that be, and what is the first thing you would say to them? 


While it’s difficult to select one person, I would like to meet Ada Lovelace and ask her about her experiences as an historic woman technologist in her time-period and context.

With rapid-fire keynotes, in-depth breakout sessions, networking opportunities, an exhibit hall, demos, social events and the FinTech Cup, The Summit is the place to be for all things payments!

Register today at www.payments.ca/summit